Six on Saturday – 9/12/2017

SOS155
Maisie decided I needed some help. Not with the gardening, help to make the blog more appealing in difficult times. What is it with cats and grasses.

One.
Rhododendron ‘Merganser’. This is the only Rhododendron we have left now, other than a couple of deciduous Azaleas and, come to think of it, a couple of evergreen Azaleas. I still don’t think of Azaleas as being real Rhododendrons. Rhododendrons are fabulous, I love them, but they don’t give good value in a small garden; they just don’t last long enough. This one is very small, with yellow bells in spring. I’ve put it in because apart from my bamboo, it’s the only thing I have with ornamental bark. You just have to imagine that the stems are more than half an inch thick.
SOS149

Two.
A quick mash-up of a few of the odds and ends that are still flowering.
SOS154

Three.
Bismarckia nobilis. This absolutely fabulous palm comes originally from Madagascar. The intensely glaucous leaves are 5-6ft across with quite sharp points. Now that this one has a bit of a trunk and has had its lower leaves removed it is a bit easier to live with than it used to be with leaves to the ground. It will eventually reach up to 12m in height, with a single trunk.
SOS156

Four.
The observant among you will have twigged to a slight continuity issue between items two and three. That is because between taking the two pictures, I flew half way round the world and am now about an hour’s drive north of Brisbane. It’s 32°here, in Celsius not Fahrenheit, sunny though with a strong possibility of showers, perhaps even a thunderstorm. I’m here for a while, so Saturday postings will have a tropical flavour for some time.
I’m a bit out of my depth with the plants. This one is another palm, much planted for shade as it’s multi-stemmed but not so tall. I don’t know it’s name. I shall try and find out.
SOS157

Five.
Agave attenuata. Massively popular in warmer parts of the world, this is just about hardy enough to survive in very mild west country gardens. It lacks the fearsome spines at the leaf tips that most of the other Agaves have. It readily spreads to form clumps of rosettes and eventually flowers, producing a spike rather like Eremurus, the fox tail lilies.
SOS158

Six.
Frangipani. Plumeria is as quintessentially tropical as you can get. Making a tree to about 5m high and at least as much wide, they have very flamboyant flowers with a sweet scent. You’ll be seeing this again.
SOS159

So the cats and the garden have been left in someone else’s care. Hopefully all will be well.
Between taking the pictures earlier today and waiting for the UK to catch up, the weather has turned spectacularly. It is now flashing and crashing and the rain coming down in torrents. It’s early evening, 10 hrs ahead of UK, and I desperately need sleep. Visiting everyone else linked from ThePropagator’s blog will have to wait until tomorrow.

 

13 thoughts on “Six on Saturday – 9/12/2017

  1. You’re making me miss Australia! We only moved back in March.
    Love the Frangipanis!
    I can’t remember the name of that orange stemmed palm either but I like it – there’s a red stemmed one too (which I also don’t know the name of)
    The Gardens by the Bay in Singapore have a huge grove of Bismarckia and it’s truly stunning.

    Like

    1. I found the red one on Google, sealing wax palm, and I think this is possibly related. I’ll look out for it in Brisbane Botanics, they’re bound to have it. We’re going to have to do a stopover in Singapore again, I’ve seen pictures of the Singapore Gardens, would love to see it for real.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. A great half dozen! Love the Bismarckia, & am very glad it’s now an amenable garden member. Yes, cats & gardens. Interminable warring love affair. Hope you’ve caught up on your sleep!

    Like

  3. Loved the mash up photo and then to be transported to the other side of the world! What lengths we go to for #sixonsaturday It has snowed here and no doubt will be cold and icy tomorrow. Enjoy Brisbane, sun and rain.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s