Six on Saturday – 12/3/2022

The work on our driveway has ground on all week and will run a couple of days into next week. I’ve not done much in the garden, which continues to slowly awaken from its slumbers. Another foul spell of windy and wet weather is forecast for this afternoon which I’m not looking forward to since I shall be driving back from Rosemoor in north Devon. There is a flower show, there will be camellias, my involvement is required. Sitting in judgment on my fellow camellia enthusiasts brings on imposter syndrome big time. Part of me would prefer to be competing but my smallish, rather exposed garden doesn’t lend itself to producing perfect blooms.

I dodged the showers yesterday to have a look round at what was strutting its stuff. It was a five on friday sort of week in truth, but that’s not the brief so I looked some more.

One.
Camellia ‘Adorable’ seems certain to be this year’s outstanding performer. For some reason my plant seems to be markedly slower growing and more compact than the only other plant of it I know in the national collection. No complaints there. The light does funny things to the colour and I haven’t corrected it, sorry.

Two.
We have a few ‘Tete a Tete’ daffs about but only one survivor of the various other sorts I’ve planted in the last couple of years. I’m sure we’ve got eelworms or narcissovirus or some such. I count myself lucky if they come up and flower in their first year, never mind subsequently. I’m in raptures about ‘Rapture’. Ron Scamp’s bulb catalogue came in the post this week, is that very early or very late? More temptation to resist.

Three.
Some of my double primroses are hanging in there. This one is pretty good but I really must divide and replant it when it finishes flowering. It may have a name, it probably has a name. At time of writing it’s dark and I’m not going looking.

Four.
One of the various self sown hellebores caught my eye because it had very large white flowers. Move in close with the camera and look it in the face not the back of its head and it’s not white and there is no sense of scale to tell you how big it is. It’s still nice though.

Five.
Driveway update.

Six.
Camellia trichocarpa. Pretty much without exception, when someone has decided they don’t like a group of plants, be it Fuchsias, Begonias, Roses or whatever; what they are talking about is the ‘improved’, hybrid confections with which they are too familiar. Introduce those people to the original wild species and their enthusiasm can often bee re-ignited. Like this Camellia species. Big blooms for a species too, 8-9cm across.

The day has dawned bright, sunny and calm but it’s not going to stay that way. Still, I’m off to a flower show, can’t complain about that. The sheer simple normality of it is something for which I’m grateful. Normal also is the arrival of The Propagator’s weekly post and the links to many more. I’ll read them later.

39 thoughts on “Six on Saturday – 12/3/2022

    1. ‘Adorable’ by name, adorable by nature. I could have won prizes with it today if I’d been competing. Actually, there were two pairs of judges and one on the other team had entries in a couple of the classes we judged, so I may try to pull that off next year.

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  1. The driveway looks almost finished, looking good! Adorable is bonkers, how could you possibly get anymore flowers on that one shrub. My heart is won by the C. trichocarpa, beautiful. Hope you had a good time at Rosemoor and a safe journey home.

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    1. You’re never safe on the roads when it’s pouring with rain, in fading light, doing 70 down the A30 and being overtaken by people who don’t even have sidelights on. On the other hand, I had a great day at Rosemoor, talking camellias till my throat was sore.

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  2. I wonder why Camelia Adorable is not available, you have certainly proved its garden suitability there Jim. Or else you have proven your capabilities and I am sure you are a worthy judge.

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    1. The big problem with camellias is that there are so many of them. Garden centres will buy from wholesalers who are only interested in the most popular varieties and there are only a handful of specialist nurseries growing a decent range, but that’s still likely to be well below 200 varieties. It’s not practical to do more, you end up with some that you sell none at all of in a year.

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  3. Your driveway will be as gorgeous as a driveway can be! I think Adorable loves up to its name. Simply smothered I blooms. Have a blast at the flower show, Jim – “sitting in judgement” ha!

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    1. One of the exhibitors wryly commented that my judging abilities hadn’t improved since last year. Another newbie exhibitor was chuffed to have won what he did. You ride the emotional rollercoaster with them to a degree. They’re mostly people I know well.

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    1. There’s something out there banging in the wind and I’m not keen on going out to see if it’s fixable. It’ll keep me awake if I don’t. I hope Adorable doesn’t lose to much flower, it’d be nice to enjoy it for a bit longer.

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  4. Oh my! ‘Adorable’ is . . . bright. You can not hide that color. It would be nice to be able to appreciate and ‘see’ color like everyone else does. White and the simple colors that I prefer must be boring to everyone else.

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    1. I’ve been waiting weeks for Camellia ‘Ariel’s Song’ to flower properly, I think you’d approve. Maybe next week. I have quite a few low key types, and some high key types, as befits my Jekyll and Hyde character.

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      1. I can approve of any of them (I think) while growing them on the farm. I just prefer milder color for my own garden. Well, I do like red. I just prefer ‘simple’ red, rather than overly bright red. Anyway, those bright and rich colors are appealing to others, which makes them appropriate for their gardens.

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      2. Colour is even more elusive than hardiness when it comes to pinning it down in a garden. A few bright spots of colour can be the making of a mainly green setting then a few days later when more flowers are out, ruin the same scene. Except that one person will love one and hate the other and another will take the opposite view. Pleasing some of the people some of the time is a victory.

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    1. I moved that camellia last year or the year before, just a couple of feet back from the path. It’s probably why it set so much flower bud, then the weather held it back for weeks then warmed enough for them all to open at once. Maybe I should go round and undercut some of the others.

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  5. I’ve got it sorted! Or, rather, Jonathan sorted it last weekend. No more excuses or bad language…….from me, that is. That first camellia is stunning and the last one is clearly a “gentler” variety. The driveway is looking very smart. Will we see the finished job next week? Glad your talk went well and I hope the throat has recovered. I remember a sore throat after every first day back at school, I hadn’t projected my voice for a while.

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    1. I didn’t actually do a talk, just a lot of talking. I went straight for a medicinal beer when I got home, that helped. I very much hope I’ll be showing off the completed drive next week, if I’m not it’ll be because something went badly wrong!

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  6. Having our driveway re-paved is on the to do list. How my heart sank when I read your of how long yours has taken. But it is looking good and almost finished. Those camellias are a good salve for the soul!

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    1. There were a few complications that made the drive a longer job, two weeks in the end. My ears are still ringing with the sounds of disc cutters, wacker plates, pressure washer and the ubiquitous loud radio. Needless to say, if I had it done again I’d now know what questions to ask before they even start.

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      1. Just had my first chat with possible contractor. Sounds like my neighbours won’t be too thrilled either. Now wondering what I should have asked him!

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      2. I found it very difficult choosing a contractor. You want to be confident they will do a good job, more than do it for the cheapest price. I’ll email you a few notes around the things I’d have done differently if I’d known.

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