Six on Saturday – 30/10/2021

The rain gauge yesterday morning had accumulated 52.5mm in the prior 24hrs and it was a very soggy garden that I wandered round, looking for survivors to include here. There was more than I expected; the usual mix at this time of year of late performers and earlier performers just hanging in with a last gasp flower or two. I’m guessing the rain gauge will have a similar amount today too, but I’ve not been out.

One.
Chrysanthemum ‘Dulwich Pink’. Having mentioned three of my four recent acquisition Chrysanthemums in a single item last week, here is the fourth, performing solo.

Two.
Fuchsia ‘Obcylin’. For the last couple of seasons all the garden fuchsias and most of the pot ones have been cut hard back at the end of the season, stripped of any remaining leaves and cleaned around to remove dead leaves and flowers; all in an effort to keep Fuchsia gall mite at bay, As a result, most have had to make a good deal of new growth before they could flower and many still have flower on them now. Most of the encliandra section Fuchsias that people grow have tiny vivid pink flowers so this one is a welcome change, with slightly larger than average blooms as well. It’s an interspecies cross; F. obconica x F. cylindracea, not as far as I know reckoned to be hardy but when we have a few plants going one will get left out to put that to the test.

Three.
Plectranthus argentatus. A month ago when the flowers on this started to appear I put it in a six and said that I thought it would be better with the flowers removed. They weren’t and here is the result now. I was wrong, I admit it. It has that quality of glowing in low light too, which makes it even more worth having at this end of the season.

Four.
Wandering about, I spotted a flash of blue where no flash of blue should have been. Closer inspection, and the plant is about 2 inches tall, revealed this, which I think might be Lobelia syphilitica, an ID I’d love to have confirmed by someone who’s grown it, as I never have, at least knowingly. I have absolutely no idea how it got there.

Five.
Passiflora ‘Damsel’s Delight’. I can’t speak for the damsel’s but I am delighted with this. I included it in a six on the twelth of June and I doubt whether there has been a day since when it hasn’t had at least one bloom on it. And this is a young plant, only planted back in the spring and mostly consisting of a single stem with a few smallish laterals. It gets a ten from me, no danger.

Six.
Fuchsia ‘Lechlade Debutante’. This is another interpecies hybrid, F. paniculata x F. lampadaria. I know nothing about F. lampadaria but F. paniculata is similar to F. arborescens, big chunky species that need time and space to flower well. Cut back hard, as has been our practice, ‘Lechlade Debutante’ doesn’t get around to flowering until September or even later. This year I shall give it a light trim rather than a short back and sides, put it in my tunnel and hope that next year it fulfils its undoubted potential.

And that, good people, is my half dozen for this week. I’m off to Rosemoor today for an RCM meeting, a day of talking plants with like minded people. A sense of normality is slowly returning. I’ve been booked to do a couple of garden club talks too, so they’re starting to open up as well. ‘Normal’ now means speaking to people from a bit further back, getting used to a cool breeze where you once would have closed the window, spacing the chairs out rather more. I can live with that, better to do normal things a bit differently than not do them at all.
Running a hundred miles is not normal, but we’re talking about the ship’s captain, so he’s allowed to be exceptional, it could even be a requirement. He puts the links to other crew members here, be sure to check them out.

42 thoughts on “Six on Saturday – 30/10/2021

  1. As I write this, it’s raining heavily; that’s the first serious rain we’ve had so far. 52 mm is pretty substantial!

    I really like both of the interspecies hybrid Fuchsias. I’m not very well acquianted with Fuchsias (beyond the usual garden centre fare) but I’ve very much enjoyed the various species you’ve featured over the summer.

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    1. There was a point when breeders in Holland and Belgium were churning out species hybrids, many of them really lovely varieties. I don’t think they ever caught on as well as they might have, which is a real shame since they’re probably going to include more gall mite resistant varieties than the run of the mill varieties you see everywhere.

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  2. I review of 10 for Damsel’s Delight as well as commendations as well as cultural tips for Fuchsias are much appreciated.

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    1. Like F. regia serrae that I featured last week, it was one we sold at the nursery where I worked, but didn’t have a plant of ourselves when I left. We stumbled on it while visiting someone else’s garden and were given cuttings. Didn’t expect to see it again.

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  3. Is that Passiflora ‘Damsel’s Delight’ a fruiting cultivar. It is such a weird genus. Some of the hybrids which should probably be sterile produce a few fruit, while some of the straight species do not. We just recently procured a cultivars with blooms that are so similar to yours that I think that it could be the same. I do not remember the name. It is not expected to produce fruit. We would like to get a second fruiting cultivar next to it. A fruiting sort used to be grown in orchard where Beverly Hills (in the Los Angeles region) is now. Suckers from what are thought to be those original plants probably still survive in some regions. One lived at the home of my colleague’s parents for as long as anyone could remember, and it would not die! However, it looked like an ornamental type, and produced no fruit.

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      1. They certainly are pretty, but if I grew them in my own garden, I would prefer to get fruit. The most productive sorts supposedly bloom with less flashy flowers, but the few fruiting sorts that I notice in nurseries seem to be a compromise, with reasonably good fruit production, and delightful bloom.

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      2. Oh, this gets confusing. I forget which are frost tolerant and which are not. In the coastal climates of Southern California, all do just fine through winter. Those that naturalized from fruiting sorts that formerly grew in the orchards look just like Passiflora caerulea, . . . and they do not produce fruit. I suspect that the Passiflora caerulea naturalized ‘after’ the orchards were replaced by urban development, so are not actually related to the orchards. In this region, I almost never see fruit on Passiflora caerulea, but those that do produce fruit can produce quite a bit of it.

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      3. On waste ground near where our relatives live in Australia there was a truly stunning scarlet flowered passion flower clambering over everything. P. coccinea or miniata I think. It’s probably an invasive weed.

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      4. Seeing it as an invasive weed makes one hesitant to try it, even in completely different climates. That is sort of why I am careful about the various passion fruit vines here, even though I know of none that is terribly invasive. I know how difficult they can be to get rid of in Los Angeles county, and they are not even classified as invasive there yet.

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      5. As much as we all worry about invasive species, there is increasing pressure on the indigenous flora from climate change, pests and diseases. We’re in the middle of losing most of our ash (Fraxinus) to disease for example, having lost most of our elms a few decades ago. It creates a vacuum which nature will try to fill and with a pretty small number of native species to begin with, there could well be merit in having a bit of a range of non-native species rather than just more of the shrinking range of species we have. Or is that heresy?

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      6. Heresy!
        Although, I do get it. I will never admit to it, but I know that in the future, what we have here, even as it continues to change, will be ‘the’ ecosystem. There is nothing that we can do about it. The invasive exotics can not be exterminated, and even if they could be people continue to bring more in! You would think that people would have learned by now, and perhaps some have, but there is more available than ever, and from so many weird sources, and too many who do not care about it. The diseases and pathogens are brought in by the same means, although generally indirectly.

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      7. We’re currently under a plant movement restriction order here because of an outbreak of some newly discovered disease a few miles away. I’m not allowed to move Douglas Fir, pines and a couple of other things. It was in one of the national newspapers that I don’t read, a small note on an inside page. I then looked up the details on the Ministry website. I doubt whether one person in a thousand, even in the area affected, is aware of it. There’ll be people walking their dogs or whatever near the seat of the outbreak in all likelihood. Like fossil fuels, international trade in plants and people travelling around a lot, the things that cause the problems; are not things people can or will give up readily.

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      8. Yup! As the Phytophthora ramorum killed so many coast live oaks and other trees here, we were supposed to wash tires and boots after going through infested areas. Of course that is not practical, and no one knew where the infected areas were. Deer and wildlife did not comply.

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  4. The Fuchsia ‘Obcylin’ is new to me. Original by its small size and colour.
    I also do like in your Six this passiflora. Here too I have a passiflora ( P tarmaniana ) that blooms late and I had to bring it in the greenhouse to be able to enjoy it a little more…

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    1. I rate the Passiflora very highly so far. It now faces its first winter outdoors, the first real test. I had to look up P. tarmanniana; its quite like P. antioquiensis, which I have grown in the past but which isn’t hardy either. They’re rather big to grow inside.

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      1. P. Tarminiana looks like mollissima. I got seeds from P mollissima but they were actually P tarminiana , rather sold instead of mollissima. Mine is a bit hardier than antioquiensis but will stay in the greenhouse for the winter. 3m tall … and therefore a bit of trimming necessary in the spring.

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    1. Everyone had a good day at todays Rosemoor meeting but there were around 50 people there and last week about 1 in 50 had covid in the UK apparently, so it’s not without risks.

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    1. When we went to Chelsea that Plectranthus was in displays at almost every station between Victoria and Arundel. I’d love to know whethet they’re all flowering too, or have been cut down.

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  5. I did have lobelia syphilitica very briefly. I don’t really want to have to admit to this but I planted it last autumn (and it did look like yours) and I must have weeded it out in the spring tidy up (hangs head in shame) for there has been no sign of it since. I’d say it was about 12 inches high and was a youngish plant.

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  6. Love the crew members idea, thank you. Beautiful selection today, I particularly like the fuchsias, though I’m a sucker for a passiflora too, and the plectranthus is lovely. I’m a bit surprised at how well it’s doing, as my understanding was that plectranthus come from a summer rainfall area, but perhaps that’s only some of them. Very pretty shimmering quality.

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    1. I can never remember whether it’s the summer rainfall or winter rainfall South African plants that are supposed to be relatively easy here. I can tell you it’s as thirsty as any plant I grow and needed watering every day through the summer. We always grow it in pots, I don’t know how it would fare in the ground. I’d be worried for the plants next to it I think.

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  7. I like your gradual move to the new normal. We all benefit from getting out and about and interacting with others. I pulled up a passiflora this year. It had run riot over the trellis and I wanted a clematis to have more space. The passiflora is making a comeback at the base though, perhaps I’ll let it start over again, they have such interesting flowers.

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    1. I’ve been super impressed with ‘Damsel’s Delight’. There’s a white form from the same breeder called ‘Snow Queen’ which I’ll get if I see it. There were lots of ‘Damsels Delight’ in B & Q earlier in the week, but no ‘Snow Queen’.

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