Six on Saturday – 24/7/2021

This week I was minded to run with a theme of yellow, but could only find five decent contenders and wanted to include at least one white. Yellow features strongly then but not exclusively.

One.
Crocosmia ‘Paul’s Best Yellow’. All is relative. Compared to Crocosmia ‘Hellfire’ at the bottom of the picture it is just about yellow but next to a lemon yellow it is very definitely orange, or golden. We have long had a nameless yellow Crocosmia that is singularly reluctant to flower. I don’t think we shall have it much longer now that this one has joined the ranks.

Two.
Yellow Dahlia. This is nameless, not because I have lost the name but because it is one of my own seedlings and I haven’t given it a name. It stood out among the plants I had on my allotment last year so, lacking a yellow of any sort, I transferred it to the garden this year to see how it performs. So far so good. If I do give it a name it won’t be ‘Jim’s Best Yellow’.

Three.
Hypericum ‘Magical Something or other’. Our localish garden centre had a few varieties a couple of years back and we chose what we thought was the best of them, then promptly lost the label. The various flavours are too similar for there to be much chance of naming it now. I probably care about that only a little more than the leaf cutter bee that has been at it.

Four.
Antirrhinum. Sue came home from Morrisons with a couple of these last year. When they’d done flowering I collected seed and sowed it this spring with no particular place in mind for them to go. They ended up getting popped into gaps in a number of places and are a sufficiently cool yellow not to be clashing too horribly, at least not to my untutored and unrefined eye. Almost all came true; there is one apricotty coloured thing that a purist might have rogued out.

Five.
Impatiens auricoma x bicaudata. This is another tender perennial that is absurdly easy from cuttings and very happy to be planted out for summer once the risk of frost has passed. Provided it has enough moisture it will then flower until the autumn. We give them only enough heat to keep them frost free in winter and they would prefer a bit more. It has yellow in it.

Six.
The last one is white. We were given a few small plants of a white Cleome last year and in the autumn I was able to collect a good quantity of seed. I sowed it in late February and now have plants flowering at around 4 feet. Not having done well with Ammi or Orlaya this year, I shall probably put all my eggs in one basket next year with Cleome. Maybe I should do a later sowing too, to give me a reserve for filling gaps as well as an extended display.

All the above was written yesterday evening and the weather forecast was for substantial rain, which would have been most welcome. Sadly, most of it missed us, it settled the dust and refreshed the garden a little. It’s a good deal cooler too, so that will help us, though it won’t be what the people who were working in last week’s heat and are headed off on their hols now will want to hear. People like our own MC, the Propagator, who is headed this way, if not this far. On the other hand, leaving behind a garden in the week we’ve just had, in the care of someone else or in the care of an automatic watering system; different sort of stress. Onward.

27 thoughts on “Six on Saturday – 24/7/2021

  1. I find myself preferring yellow Crocosmia to orange and red. There’s a rather fetching one in my brother’s garden which I’ve had my eye on for some time: quite short, big yellow flowers.

    The Cleomes look right at home. I grew some one year, but never quite decided where to put them; they got shoved in a corner and sulked accordingly!

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    1. Crocosmia is yet another plant where far too many varieties have been named, with virtually no difference between them. I now have a good yellow, orange and red and for the time being I’m done.

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    1. I think my yellow Crocosmia need is now filled by the one variety. It’s hard to imagine another different enough to be worth having as well, and as good as this one. People do get confused by the distinction between ‘need’ and ‘must have’ don’t they?

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  2. A lovely selection of yellows, with the dahlia taking my fancy. The Impatiens is unusual, a lovely two-tone colour. I’ve only grown Cleome’s once, and it was a pink flowering one, but I rather like the white one.

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    1. Dahlia breeding seems to consist of growing several very different varieties; collect, sow and grow on as many seedlings as possible; pick the best 5% and dump the rest. Repeat a few times then pick the best 5% from the selected ones. Time, space and ruthlessness.

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  3. Not much rain here either, not yet anyway. Impatiens, lush! I do like cleomes and white ones are very stylish. The dahlia is lovely, nice selection. Hope you get a bit more rain before the weekend is out.

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    1. No more rain, sadly. It’ll be waiting for tomorrow pm when we’re open. That could be the first time anything I’ve been responsible for has been described as stylish. I’m all aglow!

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  4. I like ‘Paul’s Best Yellow’ and think ‘Jim’s Best Yellow’ would be a perfect name for that Dahlia. I grew Ammi majus from seed this year too, but they have remained tiny plants, though not eaten by the S&S which is a bonus. maybe I’ll give Cleome a go next year. Crocosmia (or Montbretia) are like weeds here. And the taller ones (I’m looking at you Lucifer) fall over. Not a good look.

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  5. That Cleome is a pretty plant, I haven’t seen it before, it goes well with the verbena. We are still waiting for the forecast rain to arrive, I was hoping not to have to get out the watering can…….I will delay it until this evening.

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  6. Nice yellows, I think they are cheery. I have a yellow handbag for that reason. I have always admired Cleome, as my Dad grew some white and pink ones for my mother one year. I don’t know what the private joke was as I was too young. Sadly I never asked my parents when I grew up, but it stuck with me and always think of my parents when I see them.

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    1. A woman came into the nursery once and in the course of conversation declared that she didn’t like yellow. I put on the best incredulous tone I could muster and said, you mean you just drove down that lane with a carpet of primroses on both sides and you don’t like yellow? What is wrong with people? Don’t use it in a colour scheme that doesn’t call for it, but to dislike a portion of the spectrum makes no sense to me.

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  7. Yellow crocosmia or montbretia is rad! I think I saw this one before. The common orange sort is a major weed here, although I intend to continue to grow bulbs from the first that I grew when I was a kid. When I first got it, before I realized what a major weed it is, I noticed a single fat clump of it that was blooming yellow, but never got copies of it. It was likely just an aberration of the rest, but could have been planted intentionally by someone who, like me, was not aware that it is a major weed. I have not seen it since then. Even if I found it, I would not likely grow it, just because one type is more than enough. I deadhead it to prevent it from tossing seed.

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    1. The common orange montbretia is a widespread weed here too, and growing in all sorts of places where you wonder how it made it, given it doesn’t have wind blown seeds. Totally ineradicable now, and, I’m told, is a valuable food source for some rare butterfly/moth or other.

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      1. You know, the blue gum and red gum that are somewhat naturalized here have been very disruptive to local ecosystems, yet some people get very protective of them because the monarch butterflies and others swarm to them while they bloom. What they do not mention is that the native species that rely on the monarch butterfly for pollination are inadequately pollinated. The rare butterfly or moth that likes the montbretia may likely be distracted from other ecological duties. Furthermore, it may be rare just because it is ‘naturally rare’. I mean, even in an ideal situation, there may not be many of them.

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      2. The most invasive species in the history of the planet, humans, have massively disrupted every local ecosystem in every corner of the planet. I see very little sign that they’ll ever stop.

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      3. Well, I do not expect to repair any of the damage, but I do not like to perpetuate it either, which is why I am hesitant to plant something as simple as perennial pea and montbretia. In our region, the increased fire danger is a major concern that can only be addressed by some sort of intervention. Such intervention involves both the ‘management’ of invasive species, as well as the responsible management of native species that are recovering from clear cut harvest.

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  8. The white cleome s a stunner, I shall go back to growing them again but in white. Lovely yellows – I’m one of those not so keen on yellow but I wouldn’t be without primroses and cowslips. Crocosmia are eternally on my think about list and they have just moved up a notch. I do have some that have never flowered but this year it looks like they will.

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    1. I just checked on my other yellow Crocosmia and it seems to have some flowers coming, but it’ll need to be good not to be the one that misses out in the next round of musical plants.

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  9. I liked your yellow selection, particularly the Crocosmia. I really like Crocosmia but only have Lucifer in the garden at the moment. I sometimes get accused (and accuse myself ) of not liking yellow in the garden, but it’s more that some yellows can look too harsh in combination with other colours. I have Rosa Golden Showers which looks hideous against the brick walls of the house, but looking from the inside of the house it looks beautiful against the greens of the lawn, so it earns itself a reprieve for another year.

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    1. Having come out guns blazing as an advocate for yellow, I keep looking at the Crocosmia and wondering how best to use such a great colour without it dominating everything else. Perhaps the only way is to put it in the company of equally strong colours but I’d rather do something a bit different if I could think of what.

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